Subscribe to the Journal:

 

If you would like to support the Journal, please do so here.  The Asia-Pacific Journal is available free to all. But your contribution allows us to improve and expand our service  in the wake of 3.11.

Donate - $25, $50, $100



Join Us:JapanFocus Twitter page  APJ Facebook Page  

Display Your BOOK, FILM, OR EVENT here

 Peace  Philosophy  Centre

Dialogue and learning for creating a peaceful, sustainable world.

 

Click a cover to order.
Click a cover to order.
Click a cover to order.
Click a cover to order.
Click a cover to order.
Click a cover to order.
The Asia-Pacific Journal: Japan Focus
In-depth critical analysis of the forces shaping the Asia-Pacific...and the world.
A Diplomat's Farewell: An Exchange on US-Japan Relations ある外交官の別れの辞  感謝と謝罪と懇願と
Sep. 15, 2013

 

This text is a letter to Japan from D. H. Garrett, a former U.S. State Department official, and a response from Yuki Tanaka, a citizen of Hiroshima. 日本語版は英語版に続きます。

 

 

Thanks, an Apology, and a Request: A Diplomat’s Farewell

 

By D. H. Garrett

 

Dear Japan,

 

            I am an admirer.  I love your beauty and your strength, your serenity and your energy, your creativity and your traditions.  Beyond that, I am deeply grateful to you for providing me with at least part of the education and experience that allowed me to follow a diplomatic career, one it is true which is over. 

            Long ago in my teenage years, nothing gave me more joy than reading.  Finally the day came though when I wanted to have the type of adventures I had been reading about, so I dropped out of college and hitchhiked around the world.  It was in the Hindu Kush Mountains of Afghanistan that I met a young Japanese musician and reporter who was writing about nomadic peoples.  Because I spoke a little Farsi I was able to help him negotiate a price for a horse and guide that was agreeable to all.   That was the beginning of my Japanese karma.  In fact we later met again by chance in Istanbul.  At that point we decided to return to Europe together, where he had once performed as a musician and still seemed to have quite a few girlfriends.  When it was time for him to return to Japan he invited me to come along.   I was though at the moment deeply involved in learning French with a beautiful young woman, and said if he didn’t mind I would try and come later.

            And this is in fact what I did.  After the tearful farewells of a lovely summer romance, I went to Japan and stayed with my friend in a little village high in the mountains of Niigata, the Snow Country.  It was everything that Miyazawa Kenji might have written about, a place almost of heaven on earth because the earth was still full of moon, and stars, and magic.  There were spirits in every tree and rock and animal and the gods and goddesses were not so far away that they didn’t make an appearance from time to time.   Here I planted rice, and weeded rice, and harvested rice, and shoveled snow from the roof and yes, drank quite a bit of “Dobroku.”  Maybe it was the Dobroku, but the result was that I managed to learn a little Japanese, too.  This helped greatly in receiving my next fortunate bit of Japanese karma.

            After eventually returning to America and completing my degree, I wanted to return to Japan and so I applied to the Ministry of Education for a scholarship.  I remember going to the Japanese Consulate in Houston, Texas to take the language exam.  The staff was so amazed to find an American, a Texan who could read and write any Japanese at all that they kept coming in one by one to watch me take the test.  Finally they stopped me, mid-test and said, “that’s fine, come and have some Udon with us.”  It was all a little disconcerting, but the Udon was quite delicious and I guess you can say my Japanese karma was still good.  Because there weren’t too many Americans at that time with a bit of Japanese language knowledge, my very basic Japanese stood out and I was able to receive a scholarship, and study for two years at Kyoto University as a Kenshuin.  And this in turn, is what allowed me later to become a diplomat.

            After studying in Kyoto I returned again to America.  Perhaps it was because of the influence of the subtle beauty of that blessed place, that I decided to turn my hand to writing, painting, and composing.  Alas, being gifted in none of those, I eventually needed to find a real job.   I took the exam to enter the Foreign Service and passed the written test, but missed passing the oral exams by a few points. Here again my lucky Japanese karma appeared.  Because of my modest Japanese language knowledge, I was awarded a few extra points, just enough to pass, because the State Department at that time needed more Japanese speakers, and it had been identified as a Critical Needs Language.  Suddenly I was transformed from ‘starving artist’ into a Diplomat!         

                 And this is where I get to the serious core of this letter, which, I’m sorry to say has probably meandered on too long already.  I was eventually posted to Japan, as a Political Officer, a 2nd Secretary at the U.S. Embassy in Tokyo.   There was much that I did, in terms of human rights, and trafficking in persons, and international organizations, which I think, speaks well of a productive relationship between two equal nations.  There were though a few things I was asked to do, which I personally did not agree with, but which I carried out as part of my duties.

            I used to walk from the U.S. Embassy over to the Ministry of Foreign Affairs.  If the message I was to deliver was one I didn’t agree with, I used to walk a little slower, wondering if I was selling my soul for a diplomatic passport. Once, for example, I was asked to deliver a demarche about the U.S. position on cluster munitions (basically that the new generation of these weapons was much safer).  Japan of course has signed the Convention on Cluster Munitions, and the U.S. has not.   These horribly indiscriminate weapons (new generation or not) are rightfully banned.  For Japan’s signature though to have any real meaning, it cannot allow it’s major defense ally to store them in Japan: to do so is to be complicit.  The U.S. position (as it is with landmines) is wrong and I apologize to the people of Japan for pretending otherwise. 

            Once I was asked to deliver a demarche asking that Japan not support a U.N. resolution calling for research into the health effects of depleted uranium.  As the children stillborn, or born deformed in Fallujah and elsewhere testify, depleted uranium weapons pose a horrible health risk even after their initial explosive destructiveness.  The U.S. position is wrong and I apologize to the people of Japan for pretending otherwise. 

            Once I was asked to deliver a demarche to the government of Japan asking them not to vote in the U.N. Human Rights Council to accept the Goldstone report from the U.N. fact-finding mission to the Gaza conflict.  Had this report been written by a U.S. State Department Human Rights Officer (as I was) about a country that wasn’t a U.S. ally, it would have been widely praised by the Secretary of State.  The U.S. position was wrong and I apologize to the people of Japan for pretending otherwise.  

            Once, as a Human Rights Officer I was approached by a Japanese group, the Victims of the Red Purge, asking that I deliver a letter to President Obama, asking for an official apology for this U.S. occupation-instigated action that cost so many innocent Japanese their jobs and dignity.  I wrote a cable which included their letter, to be delivered to Washington with the recommendation that the U.S. move past this mistaken cold war overreaction and issue a formal apology.  The Embassy however overruled my recommendation.  In fact, U.S. intervention in the domestic affairs of Japan to insure it had a loyal anti-communist ally, driven largely by a hysteric level of anti communist demagoguery in U.S. domestic politics, resulted in a profound warping of Japanese democracy, a warping which has persisted for a very long time.    The U.S. position is wrong and I apologize to the people of Japan for not being successful in obtaining both an apology and a formal statement that during the Cold War, while the U.S. posed as a champion of freedom, and in some cases may have actually been so, in far, far too many countries and locales, it was deeply and criminally complicit in the suppression of many peoples who wanted that freedom but were so unfortunate as to be under regimes that touted their anti-communist credentials.

            In my own defense, I did try to raise my concerns in various venues.  I sent two Dissent Channel cables on climate change, and still recall with a smile the day in the Ambassador’s mahogany-paneled conference room sitting at his magnificently long table across from a solid line of sparkling medal-bedecked military officers when, following a presentation on anti-missile defense, I pointed out that numerous studies (including from our own Congressional Budget Office) have determined that anti-missile defenses don’t work and it seemed to me that we were doing little more than making Raytheon and other corporations and consultants, rich.  Ah, the wonderful awkwardness of that moment as if one could almost palpably hear the air escaping from so many punctured pompous balloons.      

            And this is where I now ask the people of Japan for help.  My country is no longer the country I once knew, a country moving at least in the direction of providing opportunity for all, regardless of income.  The tendency to paranoia and international law-breaking was always there, at a low fever, in clandestine and semi-clandestine actions around the world, driven by visions of American exceptionalism pandered onto an all too naïve public.  Though I like to believe that there was the intention at least to make the world a better place, in fact these actions were frankly not just frequently amateurish and inept, they resulted in the suffering and death of many.  Nor it seems, have any of the lessons been learnt.  Since 9/11 the United States has adopted a national security policy that can most charitably be described as one of anaphylactic shock.  Terrorism ranks with shark attacks in terms of real risk.   We have however so over-reacted, and misreacted to the tragedy that we have become a danger both to ourselves and to others. We have squandered our treasure in the sands of hubris and misunderstanding, and I often wonder now if the real good that we do has become just a fig leaf to cover our obscenely over-muscled shadowhand -tattooed as it is with empty slogans- that wields death and destruction at the press of a button, but doesn't know how to build, and doesn't seem to have the slightest grasp of history.   Out of the excesses of our fears, we have perverted our own constitution, and become a surveillance state, in which the government itself moreover has become, in the words of Nobel Prize winning economist Joseph Stieglitz, a “government of the 1% by the 1 % and for the 1%.”  With a populace mired in debt, befuddled by vapid corporate media-tainment, and worshiping mindlessly at the rat-race temple of empty consumerism, America is now essentially run by the type of military-industrial-political-banker cabal that President Eisenhower had warned about. 

            Japan please think twice, thrice about the things America asks you to do.  Please be a good friend and send as much of our military home as possible.  We cannot afford it anymore.  Our poor are getting poorer, our education systems are falling behind, and our infrastructure is crumbling. Say that you are happy to work with us, but only if we find a way to either harness or reign in our greed so as to conserve and restore the earth’s natural systems which are all now rapidly being destroyed.  Say that you would be happy to be our friend and ally in the greatest battle ever fought, the battle to preserve humanity and the earth from the now rapidly advancing onslaught of climate change.  But do not get caught in the misguided adventurism of a decaying empire that is flailing about at phantoms, while the real dangers that haunts it, -climate change, environmental degradation, and the rapidly growing level of inequality of its own people- have essentially been sacrificed on the alter of a military-industrial-political-financial machine that is its own worst enemy.

 

 

With the Deepest Respect and Love and Thanks,

 

Daniel H. Garrett

Former Political Officer, Foreign Service, U.S. Department of State and Second Secretary, U.S. Embassy, Japan 2008-2010,

 

DISCLAIMER:  The views expressed herein are solely those of the author, and do not necessarily reflect those of the U.S. Department of State or the U.S. Government. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A Response to the Letter from Mr. D. H. Garrett

- Co-responsibilities of American and Japanese Citizens – 

 

Yuki Tanaka

 

Dear Mr. Garrett,

 

I was very moved by your honest and sincere letter. It is reassuring to know that among the staff of the U.S. State Department is a conscientious person like you, who entertains doubts about your own government’s policies, yet is struggling to improve your nation. I hope that some of your former colleagues will have the courage to speak out while they are still in office and criticize the U.S. government in order to change its political course for the better. I wonder if this is too optimistic a dream.

 

Let me begin my response with a brief explanation of my own personal background as you did in your letter.

 

I was born and grew up in a small country town in Fukui Prefecture, not far from the large Zen temple, Eiheiji, which means ‘temple of eternal peace.’ Founded in 1244 by the master monk Dogen, it belongs to the Soto sect. It is a beautiful, quiet place surrounded by mountains and the magnificent, clean Kuzuryu (the dragon with nine heads) River, which flows nearby. There is a brewery in this town that makes nice sake – one of my favorites. You may know that even today more than 100 young men live in the temple, training to become qualified Zen monks. Unlike you, I was not at all interested in reading as a child. I was boisterous and played outdoors, running about and getting dirty. Yet, whenever I saw those young trainee monks outside the temple, I could not help feeling restrained and quiet, overcome with a respect that I didn’t really understand. I enjoyed school until I was about 9 years old, but from grade 4 onwards it offered little to interest me. You probably know that the Japanese school system was and still is basically designed to cram tedious factual knowledge into children’s heads. It does not aim to nurture creativity and the imagination of the individual. Frustration with this rigid system led me to dislike school intensely and I directed my feelings of anger and dissatisfaction at the teachers, thereby becoming a ‘problem child.’ In those days corporal punishment was widely sanctioned and I became a victim of the teachers’ constant violence, which made me more and more rebellious. This continued until graduating from senior high school.

 

When I moved to Tokyo to attend university it was at the peak of the students’ political movement, and along with many of my fellow students, I became deeply involved. It was a great opportunity to express my ‘rebellion against authority.’ As a result, I hardly attended lectures and continued to be disinterested in reading. Yet, when the student movement began to wane and our zeal for social reformation quickly faded in the early 1970s, I suddenly realized that I did not have the knowledge to critically analyze the society of my own country. It was then that I developed a strong desire for knowledge and started reading voraciously. I have never read so intensely and widely in my life as in the first half of the 1970s.

 

It is a real irony that a person like me, who hated school so much, became a university professor. Yet, teaching and research alone never satisfied me. For many years now I have found a balance by also being involved with different grass-roots civil movements. I strongly believe that university teaching and research can be enhanced by interaction with civil movement activities outside the university, thereby stimulating and enriching both groups of people.

 

It is for this reason that I have such admiration for your fellow countryman, the late Professor Howard Zinn, who so successfully spread his work across these three fields. Of course I am no match for Professor Zinn, although I base my personal approach on this same philosophy. I have long been involved in many social and political movements including anti-nuclear, anti-war, anti-U.S. military bases, seeking the Japanese government’s war responsibility for such atrocities as the ‘comfort woman’ issue, maintaining Article 9 of Japan’s constitution among others. In particular, during the last 12 years, I have been active in a number of grass-roots movements in Hiroshima, where I have met many interesting people, from whom I have gained much valuable knowledge. At the same time I have endeavored to utilize this knowledge in my own academic research as much as possible. The ideas and opinions expressed in this letter thus reflect those of many of my fellow activists in Hiroshima and other parts of Japan.

 

I apologize for this rather long introduction, and would now like to respond to your letter.

 

Today, Japan, like the U.S., is facing many grave social, political and economic problems. Without question, however, the most serious matter for the Japanese people is the on-going radioactive contamination that has resulted from the catastrophic nuclear accident at the Fukushima No.1 Nuclear Power Plant that was triggered by the Great East Japan Earthquake, which occurred on March 11, 2011. It is now two and a half years since the accident and large sums of money have been spent on decontamination work in the vicinity, yet radiation levels in the area have never declined. On the contrary, each day large quantities of highly radioactive water leak from the power plant into the Pacific Ocean and TEPCO is incapable of controlling this. More than 150,000 people from Fukushima are still unable to return home and so far more than 1,500 people have died as a result of the stress caused by dislocation. There is evidence that the rate of thyroid cancer among children is rising, and the fear of radioactive contamination is deeply undermining both the physical and psychological health of men and women of all ages. The radiation contamination caused by the Fukushima Power Plant is no longer simply a problem for Japan, but unquestionably a global concern. Surprisingly, however, Prime Minister Abe Shinzo continues to promote a strongly pro-nuclear advocacy. Not only is he endeavoring to restart all Japan’s nuclear reactors as soon as possible, he also aims to export Japanese nuclear reactors to overseas countries, as if no nuclear accident had ever occurred in Japan. Inevitably, by reinforcing these nuclear policies more people will be affected by radiation. Clearly, this is undesirable and potentially criminal conduct.  

 

In September 2012 the then Noda Yoshihiko government of the Democratic Party of Japan launched a policy to stop the operation of all nuclear reactors in Japan by the 2030s and eventually to decommission them. This policy was soon scrapped, however, due to strong pressure from Japanese big businesses as well as the U.S. government. It is obvious now that the American and Japanese nuclear industries are closely intertwined, and it would be inconceivable for the nuclear industries to stop operating power plants just in Japan.

 

A television documentary recently broadcast in Japan revealed that soon after the explosions at the Fukushima reactors, the U.S. government and the U.S. military forces demanded that the Defense Ministry of Japan make an ‘heroic sacrifice’ when dealing with this nuclear accident, in order to maintain the U.S. – Japan Alliance. In response to this request, on March 17, 2011, the Japanese Self Defense Forces sent two helicopters to spray water over the troubled buildings from the sky, which was filled with highly radioactive air. This dangerous mission was utterly useless in terms of decreasing radiation levels at the power plant. In the documentary your former colleague in the U.S. State Department, Mr. Kevin Maher, who was then director of the U.S. State Department's Office of Japan Affairs, clearly testified that this heroic sacrifice was indeed requested by Mr. Kurt M. Campbell, the then Assistant Secretary of State for East Asian and Pacific Affairs. The then Japanese Minster of Defense, Mr. Kitazawa Toshimi, also testified that this request had been made.* I imagine that you, too, are aware of this incident.

 

Today the U.S. and Japan are closely intertwined not just in economic and business circles, but in the realm of military action too, where Japan has become subjugated to the U.S. Our Prime Minister, Mr. Abe, is now pushing to legalize the use of the right to collective self-defense, which has hitherto been regarded as a violation of Japan’s peaceful constitution. His final aim is to change the constitution and abolish Article 9 so that Japan would be able to possess proper military forces. It would seem that, theoretically at least, if the use of the right to collective self-defense is legalized or Article 9 of our constitution is abolished, and if the U.S. began a war against another nation, Japanese forces could be required to make an heroic sacrifice as part of this collaboration. It is an irony of history that Japanese soldiers, who were once forced to make an heroic sacrifice for their emperor, may have to show loyalty to the Stars and Stripes by making an heroic sacrifice for the American forces!

 

The Japanese government, always subservient to U.S. military power, continues to agree to U.S. demands eagerly. It has accepted the requests to relocate the U.S. base from Futenma to Henoko and to deploy the accident-prone aircraft, Osprey, in Okinawa and Iwakuni. The U.S. military base in Iwakuni is only 47 kilometers from the city of Hiroshima where I live. U.S. jet fighters constantly conduct low altitude training flights over civilian homes in and around Iwakuni City, as well as over many parts of Hiroshima Prefecture. Many civilians suffer from sound stress caused by jets and live in constant fear of plane accidents. You will be aware that as a result of the Realignment Plan of the U.S. Military Forces in Japan, to which Japan agreed in May 2006, it was decided that the Iwakuni Base would be significantly reinforced and expanded. There is a strong possibility that Iwakuni will become the base for the largest attacking forces in northeast Asia in the near future. Moreover, Kure City not far from Hiroshima City is host to a large base of Japan’s Maritime Self Defense Forces. Since the Gulf War in 1991 this has served as the base for dispatching Mine Warfare Forces and transport vessels to the Middle East and Indian Ocean each time the U.S. conducts war in these regions. These days the MSDF’s overseas operations have become a regular service due to U.S. demands. In addition, the U.S. forces hold three large ammunition depositories in and around Kure City – one in Kure City, one in Etajima, and another in Higashi Hiroshima City. It is said that the total storage capacity of these three depositories is the largest in northeast Asia. These depositories played vital roles in supplying ammunition to the American forces when they fought in wars in Korea, Vietnam, and the Middle East. It seems that large quantities of depleted uranium weapons used in the Gulf War were also stored in and transported from these storages.

 

Today, Hiroshima City is known as a ‘Peace City,’ following the killing, destruction and suffering caused by the atomic bombing. Yet, the city is surrounded by American and Japanese military facilities, which are capable of destroying the peaceful life of many people in the Asia-Pacific region.

 

The issue of anti-missile defenses is another major cause for concern and I share your opinion that they don’t work. Yet our government accepted the request from your heads of state and agreed to introduce this defense system from the end of fiscal 2003. Since then, each year 100-200 billion yen has been spent on these futile toys for our ‘sparkling, medal-bedecked military officers.’ This year tax payers will contribute 4.8 trillion yen to the defense budget, a 40 billion yen increase from last year. This includes an increase in the number of Aegis ships, used on the pretext that they are ‘anti-missile defenses.’

 

The request in your letter that we send home as many of your military as possible is not a task that can be easily achieved by Japanese civil activists. Similarly, persuading our government to reduce its military budget is equally difficult. Informing the general populace in both countries of the extent of the military commitment and entanglement of our two countries might, however, be a useful step in the right direction. I urge you to 

help your fellow countrymen and countrywomen understand the current situation of the U.S. forces stationed in Japan and ask that you demand the withdrawal of U.S. forces stationed overseas. I wonder how many American citizens are aware that there are more than 1,000 U.S. military bases worldwide that require huge sums of money to maintain. Every year our government alone spends about 200 billion yen (more than 2 billion dollars) contributing to the cost of maintaining U.S. forces in Japan. If the U.S. would cease pressure on Japan and other allied nations to commit to increase military spending and itself reduce its own massive military budget, the world would be a better place. I urge you and your fellow citizens to join us in our attempts to increase public awareness of the cost and detriment of these military arrangements.

 

Japan has many problems with its domestic policies, too. Prime Minister Abe’s promotion of economic polices under the banner of ‘Remaking Japan Robust’ is simply an old fashioned way of stimulating the economy by funding large construction projects that favor big industries. This includes such things as the 2020 Tokyo Olympics and the Trans-Pacific Strategic Economic Partnership (TPP), which incidentally completely ignore environmental issues. As a result, the population is suffering from inflation, tax increases, the sharp decrease in public health funds and other social welfare funds and the fact that currently 40 per cent of the labor force, or over 20 million workers, are part-time or casual workers, whose labor rights are not fully protected. As in your country, the poor are getting poorer, in particular single mothers and pensioners. 

 

There are many other issues, too. The current government’s policy regarding the so-called ‘Senkaku Island issue’ is totally dysfunctional, as it ignores the historical background, makes one-sided claims and fails to engage in dialogue with the Chinese government. Similarly, the government’s handling of the ‘comfort women’ issue has been equally incompetent. Mr. Abe has repeated an ignorant claim that there is no evidence to prove the enforcement of sexual slavery. Unashamedly, he publicly denounced the 1993 statement by Kono Yohei, then Chief Cabinet Secretary, acknowledging the Japanese government’s direct responsibility for this matter. The issue of Japan’s ‘war of aggression’ between 1931 and ’45 is also problematic. Mr. Abe has stated that there is currently no clear definition of ‘war of aggression,’ implying that Japan did not invade China and other Asian nations. In contrast to his statement, however, Japan’s war of aggression was clearly acknowledged as a crime against peace at the Tokyo War Crimes Tribunal, and since then the legal concept of ‘war of aggression’ has been well developed and defined by many international law specialists. Such assertions, which clearly indicate an ignorance of historical facts are causing friction, not only with China and Korea, but also with the U.S. and other Western nations. It is of great concern that this lack of information is causing Japan to lose international credibility as a nation.

 

Your comment that the U.S. appears not to have learnt from past lessons is a problem Japan also shares, as I have indicated above. Although our country was the victim of the atomic bombing, one of the most serious crimes against humanity in history committed by your government, Japan has been one of the most eager supporters of U.S. nuclear strategies. Indeed, since President Eisenhower’s announcement of ‘Atoms for Peace’ in December 1953, we have doggedly sought to use nuclear energy. The ultimate result of this pro-nuclear drive, devoid of foresight, was the disastrous accident at the Fukushima No.1 Nuclear Power Plant. As a consequence, we are now contaminating the Pacific Ocean, constantly discharging large quantities of highly radioactive water. To add to this catastrophe, there are currently 1,533 fuel rods in the spent fuel pool on an upper floor of the Unit 4 reactor building, which was badly damaged and weakened by the earthquake and the subsequent explosion. It is said that the amount of cesium 137 in this fuel pool is equivalent to 5,000 Hiroshima atomic bombs. Currently, no one really knows how to handle this problem. If this building collapses and the fuel pool loses cooling water, the consequences are unimaginable. Not only the entire Japanese Archipelago, but possibly large parts of the northern hemisphere, will be seriously affected by highly toxic radiation. Tokyo will most probably become uninhabitable and Japan’s dream of the 2020 Olympic Games will turn into an horrendous nightmare. In the long term, this is a truly serious problem, which may endanger all life on this planet.

 

Although the issue of climate change is without doubt one of the greatest issues concerning the planet and mankind, it would seem to me that the most imminent, dangerous and formidable enemy for the US-Japan Alliance is the possibility of a ‘nuclear holocaust’ on a scale never experienced until now. I would therefore urge you and your fellow American citizens to join us in an international campaign, demanding US-Japanese cooperation that unites our wisdom and knowledge in order to find and implement an effective method for solving the current Fukushima crisis. I beg you to embark on this immediately, before it becomes too late.

 

The U.S. and Japan must share responsibility for the present crisis. It was the U.S. that developed, used and proliferated nuclear weapons and vigorously promoted this technology as an energy source worldwide. Yet Japan ignorantly augmented the use of nuclear power despite our costly experience as the victims of radiation from the atomic bombing.** Both nations have a duty to protect human beings, including future generations, as well as all living creatures and the natural environment of this planet.

 

Thank you for reading my response. Lastly, I sincerely hope that many Americans and Japanese readers of this web site will join this discussion, and consolidate our efforts by exchanging ideas and opinions through this site to solve our common problems.

 

http://www.dailymotion.com/video/x12zo4r

** http://www.dailymotion.com/video/x12znzk_

 

September 11, 2013

 

Yuki Tanaka

A citizen of Hiroshima     

 

 

 

以下、元米国国務省職員D. H. ガレット氏から日本への手紙と、広島市民の田中利幸氏からの返事を紹介します。

 

 

感謝と謝罪とお願い:一外交官の退職挨拶

D.H.ガレット

 

親愛なる日本へ

 

私は日本を心から尊敬している一人です。日本の美と強さ、静寂さと活力、創造力と伝統に敬服している者です。そのうえ、私のこれまでの生涯で受けた教育と経験の一部を与えてくれ、外交官としての経歴を歩ませてくれた日本に深く感謝します。その外交官としての私の職歴も今や終わりました。

 

ずいぶん昔のことになりますが、10代の頃、私にとっては読書にまさる喜びはありませんでした。書物で読んでいて、いつか自分もやってみたいと念願していた冒険を実行する機会が実際に自分に訪れたとき、私は大学を中退してヒッチハイクで世界を周る旅に出ました。そして、アフガニスタンのヒンドゥー・クシュ山脈で一人の日本人の若者と遭遇しました。彼は音楽家であり、且つ、遊牧民についての記事も書いていました。私はペルシャ語を少々話せましたので、馬を借りてガイドを雇う際に、折り合いの値段を決める交渉で彼を助けることができました。これが私の日本との因縁の始まりでした。後日、この日本人の若者と偶然にまたイスタンブールで出会ったのです。そこで私たちは一緒にヨーロッパに旅することになりましたが、彼は、以前ヨーロッパで音楽家として活動していたこともあり、そこにガールフレンドもまだ幾人かいたようでした。彼が日本に帰国することになった折、一緒に来ないかと誘われました。ところが私はそのとき、とても美しいフランス人女性からフランス語を一生懸命習っている最中でしたので、申し訳ないが後で行くと言っておいたのです。

 

ところが、これが実際にそうなったのです。魅惑的な夏のロマンスが悲しい涙で終わったあと、私は日本に行き、その日本人の若者が住む雪深い新潟の奥深い山里の小さな村に滞在しました。そこは、全てがまるで宮沢賢治の童話に出てくるような、月と星と魔法が地球と混在しているような、地球上の天国のような所でした。草木の一本一本に、岩や動物のそれぞれに霊が宿っており、男神や女神が、しばしば現われるというわけではありませんが、いつも近くにいることが感じられる場所でした。この村で私は田植えをし、草刈りをし、稲を刈り、屋根雪をかき、そして「ドブロク」もかなり飲みました。ドブロクのおかげかもしれませんが、日本語も少し習得することができました。この経験が、私のその後の幸運な日本との因縁を強める大きな助けとなりました。

 

その後アメリカに戻り、大学教育を終えた後、日本に再度行きたかったので、日本政府の文部省奨学金に申し込みました。日本語試験を受けにテキサス州ヒューストンにある日本領事館に出かけたときのことは今でもよく憶えています。領事館のスタッフたちは、テキサス生まれのアメリカ人である私が、試験で出される日本語はなんでも読み書きできることに驚いてしまいました。そこで、試験の途中にもかかわらず、試験を中止して、「もう十分です。一緒に私たちとウドンを食べましょう」と言われたのです。私は少々面食らいましたが、ウドンがたいへん美味しかったことを憶えています。ここでも私の日本との因縁がまだ強く働いていたと言えるでしょう。当時は、日本語の知識を少々でも持っているアメリカ人はそれほど多くはいなかったので、ごく基礎的な私の日本語知識でも目立ったというわけです。おかげで奨学金を受けることができ、2年間、京都大学で研修生として勉強することができました。そして、このことにより私は、その後、外交官になれたわけです。

 

京都での研修を終えてアメリカに戻りました。たぶん、あの繊細で美しい、恵みあふれる日本の村で過ごしたことに影響されたのでしょう。私は自分の手を、文章を書き、絵を描き、作曲するために使いたいと強く願いました。でも、私はそのうちのどの才能も持ち合わせていないことから、結局は仕事を見つける必要に迫られました。国務省外務担当局に入るための試験を受け、筆記試験は通りましたが、面接試験はわずかの点数差で落ちてしまったのです。ところが、ここでまた私の日本との因縁という幸運が働いたのです。私のささやかな日本語の知識のおかげで、特別に点数が加算され、ぎりぎりで試験に合格してしまったのです。当時、国務省は日本語が話せる人員をもっと必要としており、日本語は「重要な必要語学」とされていたのです。その結果、突然私は「腹をすかした芸術家」から外交官に変身したというわけです!

 

さて、前おきが長くなったことをお詫びしますが、ここから私のこの手紙は本題に入ります。結局、私は、国務省政務官であり2等書記官として東京の米国大使館に派遣されました。人権問題、人身売買問題ならびに国際組織関連問題の多くの仕事に私は関わりました。これら面では日米両国は、相互に平等な国として積極的な関係にあります。しかしその一方で、私が個人的に賛成しない事柄で仕事の任務を与えられ、義務として遂行したこともいくつかあります。

 

私は、しばしばアメリカ大使館から外務省の建物に徒歩で出かけました。外務省に届けるメッセージの内容に自分が賛成できないときは、米国外交官パスポートに自分の魂を売渡してしまったのかと悩みながら、いつもより少しゆっくり歩いたものです。例えば、あるとき、私はクラスター弾に関する米国の(基本的に新型クラスター弾は比較的安全であるという)立場に関する申し入れ書を届ける任務を与えられました。日本が明らかに署名しているクラスター弾禁止条約に、米国は署名していません。この(新型であろうとなかろうと)ひどく無差別殺傷的な兵器が使用禁止されていることは正当なのです。しかし、この条約への日本の署名が実際に意味を持つためには、日本の主要な防衛同盟国である米国が日本国内にそのような兵器を貯蔵することが許されてはなりません。それを許すということは共謀行為に他なりません。この点で、米国の立場は(地雷の場合と同様に)間違っています。間違っていないかのような態度をとっていることに対し、私は日本の皆さんに謝罪します。

 

また別のときには、劣化ウランの健康被害に関する調査を求める国連決議を日本が支持しないようにと要求する申し入れ書を届ける任務を与えられました。ファルージャや他の地域で死産児や奇形児がみられることからも明らかなように、劣化ウラン兵器は、その使用で爆発破壊が行われた後でも、健康に重大な危険をもたらす兵器です。この点でもアメリカは間違っており、間違っていないかのような態度をとっていることに対し、私は日本の皆さんに謝罪します。

 

またあるときは、<イスラエルによる>ガザ攻撃に関する国連の事実調査の結果であるゴールドストーン報告を国連人権委員会が承認することに賛成票を投じないようにという要求を日本政府に届ける任務を与えられました。もしも、アメリカの同盟国でない国が犯した攻撃に関して、この種の報告書を、私のような国務省の人権問題担当官が書いた場合には、国務長官におおいに褒められていることでしょう。この問題でもアメリカは間違っています。間違っていないかのような態度をとっていることに対し、私は日本の皆さんに謝罪します。

 

あるとき私は、人権問題担当官として、日本のレッド・パージ被害者の団体から、アメリカが先導したこの占領政策で数多くの無実の日本人が仕事や誇りを失ったことに対して正式な謝罪を行うようオバマ大統領に要求する手紙を届けてもらいたいという要請を受けました。私は、電報でこの手紙をワシントンに送ると同時に、冷戦時代のこの行き過ぎた行為の間違いをアメリカが認め、公式謝罪を出すようにとの提案を行いました。アメリカ大使館は、しかしながら、私のこの提案を受け入れませんでした。主としてアメリカ国内政治のヒステリー的とも称せる反共民衆煽動政策に基づいて、日本が忠実な反共同盟国であることを確実にするためにアメリカが日本国内政治に介入したことは、事実、日本の民主主義をはなはだしく、しかも長期間にわたって、歪める結果となりました。アメリカはこの点で間違っています。アメリカ政府から冷戦時代のこの過ちに関して公式謝罪を引き出すことができなかったことを、私は日本の皆さんに謝罪します。この冷戦時代にアメリカは、一方で自由を守るチャンピオンとしてふるまいながら、確かにそのような場合もあったでしょうが、多くの国々や場所で、反共政策をしつこく推進する支配体制と結託して、不運にもそのような支配体制の下で自由を求めている多くの人々を抑圧することで、犯罪的な共同謀議をアメリカは行ったのです。

 

自分の弁護のためにも申し上げますが、私は様々な議題で、自分の問題意識をなんとか知ってもらおうと努めました。気候変動問題でも私は、2回、<アメリカの政策に対する>異議表示の電報を打ちました。壁板が<高価な>マホガニー材で作られているアメリカ大使の会議室で、豪奢な長いテーブルに、胸に輝く勲章をつけて列を作って座っている士官連中が、ミサイル防衛に関して意見を述べた折のことを、私は今でも笑いながら思い出さずにはいられません。そのとき私は、(米国連邦議会予算局による調査も含めて)様々な調査がミサイル防衛は役立たないことを証明していることを指摘し、製造元であるレイセオン会社やその他の関連会社やコンサルタント会社を儲けさせているだけと私には思えると述べたのです。そのときは、幾つもの豪華な風船に穴が空いて空気が漏れていく音がまるで実際に聞こえるかのような、きわめて不具合な雰囲気が続いた、素敵な一時でした。

 

さてそこで、日本の皆さんに助けていただきたいと、お願いしたいことがあります。

 

私の母国は、もはや私がかつて知っていたような、個人の収入額の如何にかかわらず全ての人間に機会を与えるような傾向にある国ではありません。妄想症にとらわれて国際法を破る傾向を常にもっており、素朴な人々の弱みにつけこんで、アメリカだけが特別という意識の下に、世界中で、秘密裏にあるいは半ば秘密裏にものごとをすすめる国となってしまいました。少なくとも、世界を少しでも良き場所にしたいという意図だけは持っていたと私は信じたいのですが、実際には、アメリカの行動は単に未熟で不器用なだけではなく、多くの人間を苦しめ死においやっています。さらには、アメリカは過去の過ちから何も学んでいないように思えます。9・11事件以来、アメリカは国家安全保障政策をとっていますが、最も同情的な表現を使ったとしても、これは神経過敏症ショックの一つとしか言いようがありません。テロ攻撃が、サメに襲われるのと同じレベルで考えられているのです。しかし、9・11事件という惨事にあまりにも過剰に反応し、間違った反応の仕方をしたため、アメリカ人は、自分たち自身にとってのみならず、他の人たちにとってまで危険な存在となってしまったのです。私たちアメリカ人は、自分たちの富を、傲慢と不理解という砂のような無意味な穴の中に浪費してしまいました。もしも私たちが何か良いことをしているとするならば、それはわずかに、強大に膨らみ過ぎた筋肉で他者を脅かしている自分たちの恥部を、あたかもイチジクの葉で隠しているかのような無意味な行為ではなかろうかと、私はしばしば思うのです。しかもその脅かし行為は、空虚なスローガンという刺青で覆われているだけで、ボタン一押しで死と破壊をもたらしているにもかかわらず、私たちはどのようにこれからの歴史を築き上げていくべきか分かっておらず、これまでの歴史をいかに把握すべきかについても全く理解していないように思われるのです。過大な恐怖心から、私たちは自分たちの憲法を歪曲し、監視国家を作り上げてしまいました。ノーベル賞受賞経済学者のジョセフ・スゥティーグリッツの言葉を借りれば、アメリカ政府は、「1パーセントの国民の、1パーセントの国民による、1パーセントの国民のための政府」となってしまったのです。負債にどっぷりつかり、企業とメディアの退屈な宣伝に踊らされ、空虚な大量消費主義という過当競争の神殿を愚かに崇拝する大衆によるアメリカは、今や、基本的には、かつてアイゼンハワー大統領が警告したように、軍産政治金融陰謀結社によって運営されています。

 

日本には、アメリカが日本に要求することを、<受け入れる前に>2度、3度と熟考していただきたい。アメリカの良き友達でいてもらい、できるだけ多くの私たちの軍隊を本国に送り返して下さい。私たちは今までのような軍隊をもはや支えきれないのです。私たちの国では貧困者はますます貧困になっており、教育制度は遅れるばかりで、社会的生産基盤は崩壊しつつあります。私たちと協力して働きたいと言って下さい。ただし、次のような条件つきで。今や急速に破壊されつつある地球の自然体系を維持再生させることに私たちが貪欲になることで、自己規制するかあるいは力を発揮する道を見いだすこと。私たちの友達でいたいし、これまでの歴史で最も偉大な闘いの同盟国であり続けたいと言って下さい。その闘いとは、人間性を守り、目下、急速に進んでいる気候変動の猛襲から地球を守る闘いのことです。しかし、妄想に向かって武力を振り回して崩壊していく帝国の誤った冒険主義に巻き込まれないように気をつけて下さい。アメリカ帝国に取り憑いている真の危険は、気候変動、環境崩壊や急速に拡大しつつある国民の間の不平等です。にもかかわらず、これらの問題が、基本的には、アメリカ自体の敵である軍産政治金融複合体制の祭壇の上で犠牲にされてきたのです。

 

深い尊敬と親愛、そして感謝を込めて。

 

ダニエル・H・ガレット

元・米国務省外務局政務官、2008年-2010年日本における米国大使館2等書記官

 

但し書き:この手紙で表明した見解は全て筆者の個人的見解であり、米国務省あるいは米国政府の見解を必ずしも反映するものではありません。

 

訳者断り:< >内の文章は訳者が説明上必要と考えて加筆したものである。

(Translated by Yuki Tanaka  訳文責:田中利幸)

 

 

 

 

D.H.ガレット氏手紙への応答:米国市民と日本市民の共同責任

田中利幸

 

 

親愛なるガレットさんへ

 

貴方が書かれたお手紙を感激して読ませていただきました。米国務省官僚のなかにも貴方のように、自国政府の政策に疑念を持ちつつ、少しでも自国を良くしたいと苦慮している人がおられることを知ることは、ほんのわずかですが私の心に安らぎを与えてくれます。貴方の同僚の多くの官僚たちが、自国を少しでも良い方向に転換させるために、退職する前に政府批判の声をあげて欲しいと願いますが、おそらくそれは叶わぬ願望でしょうか。

 

私も、貴方の手紙に習って、自分の個人的背景説明からこの応答の手紙を始めたいと思います。

 

私は、1244年に曹洞宗の道元禅師が開創した永平寺という大きな禅寺がある福井県の永平寺町に生まれ育ちました。山に囲まれた静かで小さな町で、近くには九頭龍川という美しい川が流れています。美味しいお酒を作る醸造所もあります。ご存知かもしれませんが、永平寺には現在も常に100名以上の若い見習い僧が修行に励んでいます。あなたと違って、私は、子供の頃、全く読書には関心がなく、毎日自然の中で泥だらけになって遊び回っていました。そんな私も、真面目な修行僧にはどこか尊敬の念を抱いていたのでしょう。彼らを見るたびに、いつも緊張してそのときだけは寡黙になりました。しかし、小学校4年の頃から私は学校が嫌いになり、中学、高校へと進むにつれてますます学校での授業がつまなくなりなりました。日本の教育制度は、主として大人が必要と考える知識を子供に一方的に詰め込むもので、子供一人一人が個性豊かな想像力と創造力を養えるように配慮することなど全く考えていない制度なのです。今から顧みれば、私は、そのような制度そのものに不満があったのだろうと思うのですが、当時は、子供の私にはそんなことは理解できず、ただやたらに不満やるせない毎日を学校で送っていました。私の憤懣の捌け口は教師に向けられ、常に教師に反抗する「問題児」となりました。当時は、教師による子供への体罰はほとんど公認で、日常茶飯事に行われていました。私は頻繁に体罰という暴力の犠牲者となり、その結果、ますます教師への反抗を強める「反抗生徒」となりました。

 

大学に入り東京で暮らすようになりました。しかし、当時は学生運動の最盛期で、多くの学生達同様、私も大学の授業にはほとんど出席せずに、学校時代に養った旺盛な「権力への反抗精神」を今こそ十分発散させたいと学生運動にのめり込んでいきました。ところが、数年でその運動も熱が冷めたようにピークを超えたとき、はじめて冷静に、自分はこれまで一体何をしていたのだろうか、日本社会を批判的に分析するだけの知識を自分は十分もっていないのではないかと真剣に考えるようになりました。この時点から、私には知識獲得への強い欲求が突然湧き出てきて、初めて真剣に読書をするようになりました。自分の一生で、1970年代前半のこの次期ほど貪欲に様々な本を読んだときはありません。

 

学校や大学を強く嫌っていた人間が大学教員になるという、まことに皮肉な道を私はその後歩むことになりました。しかし、私は、大学内だけでの教育・研究には全く飽き足らず、これまで長年の間、様々な草の根市民運動に関わり続けてきました。大学での教育・研究と市民活動は相互に刺激しあうものであって、その相互刺激の中でこそはじめて両方が深みと広がりを増すというのが私の信念となりました。

 

私のヒーローの一人は、したがって、そのような信念を生涯貫き、教育・研究・市民活動の全ての分野で見事な成果をあげた貴方のお国のハワード・ジン先生です。もちろん、私はジン先生の足下にも及びませんが、同じ信念に基づいて、反核兵器、反原発、反戦、反米軍基地、「慰安婦」問題をはじめとする日本政府の戦争責任追及、憲法改悪反対などの市民運動に幅広く関わってきました。とりわけこの12年ほどは、私が勤める大学のある広島で、そのような様々な活動に関わり、多くの人たちと出会い、知的刺激をおおいに受け、その刺激を研究にも活かしてきたつもりです。したがって、私の現在の思想は、私個人の思想であると同時に、日本の多くの活動仲間の考えをいろいろな形で反映しているものでもあることをご理解していただければ幸いです。

 

さて、私も前置きが長くなったことをお詫びして、本題に入ります。

 

現在、日本も貴方の国と同様に、様々な深刻な社会、政治、経済問題を抱え込んで四苦八苦しています。そんな中で、私たち市民にとって最も深刻な問題は、あらためて言うまでもなく、2011年3月11日に起きた福島第1原発事故による放射能汚染問題です。事故発生から2年半たちますが、いまだ15万人にのぼる福島県民が避難生活を余儀なくさせられており、これまで1500人を超える福島県民が災害関連死の犠牲者となっています。子供たちの甲状腺癌の発生率は確実に高まっており、放射能汚染が心身両面にわたって、老若男女を問わず多くの人たちの健康を深く蝕み続けています海に流れ続ける大量の高レベル放射能汚染水を止めることもできず、放射能汚染問題はますます悪化しており、最早これは日本一国の問題ではなく、地球的規模の問題であることは明らかです。にもかかわらず、日本の首相安倍晋三氏は、あたかも原発事故など無かったかのように原発再稼働の準備を着々と進めているだけではなく、海外へ原発建設を盛んに売り込むなど、まさに被曝を強制する「犯罪行為」と呼べる政策をがむしゃらに推進しています。 

 

前民主党野田政権は2012年9月に、2030年代までに稼働原発をゼロにして、最終的には全ての原発を廃炉にするという政策を打ち出しました。ところが、日本国内の財界からだけではなくアメリカ政府からの強い圧力もあって、この政策はつぶされてしまいました。今や日本とアメリカの原発産業は完全に一体化しているため、日本だけが原発を止めるということは、原発産業全体にとってひじょうに不都合なのです。 

 

その上、日米軍事同盟の維持という目的からも、福島原発事故直後に、アメリカ国務省と米軍の両方から、日本の防衛省に対して、原発事故処理で自衛隊が「英雄的犠牲」行動をとるようにとの強い要請があったことが、最近、日本のTVドキュメンタリー番組で明らかにされました。その要請に応えるため、自衛隊は2011年3月17日に、高レベル放射能が舞い散る空中から、2機のヘリコプターによる原発建屋への放水という危険な作業を強いられました。しかし、放射能低減策という面では、これはなんら効果のない、全く無駄な作業でした。米国務省の当時の東アジア・太平洋担当国務次官補カート・キャンベル氏がこの「英雄的犠牲」を日本側に強いたことは、当時、あなたの同僚であり、国務省で対日支援調整役を務めていたケビン・メア氏がこのテレビ番組の中ではっきり証言していますし、当時防衛大臣であった北沢俊美氏も認めています。*おそらく、あなたもこのことについては、私があらためて説明するまでもなく、熟知しておられることでしょう。

 

このように、日米両国は、経済面では大企業の密接な一体化が進んでおり、軍事面では日本は米国に完全に従属しています。このような状況の下で、現在、安倍政権は、これまで憲法違反と考えられてきた「集団的自衛権」をとりあえず強引に法制化し、ゆくゆくは憲法を改悪して自衛隊を正規の軍隊にしようと目論んでいます。この目論みが実現し、例えば米国が他国と戦争状態に入ったときには、日本の軍隊は、おそらく真っ先に「英雄的犠牲」を出すことをアメリカから強要されるでしょう。昔は天皇のために「玉砕」することを強いられた日本兵が、こんどは星条旗のために「英雄的犠牲」となることを迫られるのです。なんという歴史の皮肉でしょうか。

 

日本政府が米国の要求受入のみに汲々として、私たち市民の生命と生活の安全については全く顧みないという従属的態度をとっていることは、沖縄の普天間基地返還問題や、事故を頻繁に起こしているオスプレイの沖縄・岩国配備受け入れを見ても明らかです。岩国基地は私が住む広島市からは47キロしか離れていません。岩国市内と周辺の住民はもちろん、広島県各地の住民も、訓練のためにしばしば低空飛行を行う米軍ジェット戦闘機の騒音に悩まされ、墜落事故の危険性に脅かされながら暮らしています。ご承知のように、岩国基地は、2006年5月に日米両国が合意した「在日米軍再編計画」の結果、大幅に拡大・強化されることになり、近い将来には、米軍の極東最大の攻撃基地となる可能性があります。広島に隣接する呉市は、海上自衛隊の一大基地ですが、1991年湾岸戦争以来、アメリカが戦争をするたびに、ここが度重なる海上自衛隊の掃海艇部隊や輸送艦派遣の基地となってきました。今や、海上自衛隊艦船の海外派遣は常時化していますが、これもアメリカからの要請によるものです。実は、米軍は、この呉市内の広と江田島の秋月、それに東広島の川上の3ケ所に弾薬貯蔵庫を持っており、その弾薬貯蔵能力は極東最大と言われています。朝鮮戦争、ベトナム戦争、湾岸戦争などでは、これらの貯蔵庫が弾薬補給基地として重要な役割を果たしました。湾岸戦争で大量に使われた劣化ウラン弾も、ここに貯蔵されていたものと思われます。

 

ご存知のように、人類初の核攻撃の目標となって多くの死亡者を出し、放射能によって引き起こされる様々な癌や白血病などでこれまで多くの被爆者が亡くなっていった広島は、「平和都市」と呼ばれています。しかし、この「平和都市」の周辺には、このように、「平和」を破壊する日米両国の軍事基地や関連施設が散在しているのが実情です。

 

あなたが「全く役に立たない」と批判された「ミサイル防衛」でも、2003年度末に日本政府はアメリカの要求通りにミサイル防衛システムの導入を決定しました。以来、これまで毎年1千億円から2千億円という膨大な金額のお金が、この無駄な計画に注ぎ込まれてきました。今年度も、ミサイル防衛という口実でのイージス艦増強などで、防衛費を前年比で400億円を増額させ、総額4兆8千億円もの私たちの税金が「防衛費」として浪費されています。 

 

あなたは、「できるだけ多くの私たちの軍隊を本国に送り返して下さい」と私たちにお願いされましたが、日本の米軍基地を無くし、さらに日本の軍事予算を減らすことは、したがって、私たち日本の市民運動だけで達成するのはなかなか困難です。多くの米日両国の市民の人たちに日本における米軍基地の現状を知っていただき、アメリカでも同時に海外米軍基地撤退と米日両国の軍事予算減額の要求運動を広く展開していただかなくてはなりません。ちなみに、米国市民の何人が、世界中に1千以上の米軍基地施設があること、またそれらを維持するための財政負担の大きさを知っているのでしょうか?日本政府は、毎年2千億円という私たちの税金を米軍基地維持費の一部として出費しています。アメリカが日本その他の同盟国に軍事予算増額で圧力をかけるのを止め、自分たちもその巨額の軍事予算を削減するだけでも世界の状況は違ってくるはずです。ですから、今こそ、強力な反戦・反軍備運動を共に巻き起こすことで、私たち日本市民と連携することを強くお願いします。 

 

一方、日本政府は、国内においては、環境問題には全く留意しない、相変わらずの土建国家的バラマキ公共投資、大企業利益優先政策とそれと密接に絡んだ2020東京オリンピック開催や環太平洋戦略的経済連携協定(TPP)参加政策を、「国土強靭化」というまやかしの表現のもとで進めています。その結果、一般市民はインフレ、増税、医療費自己負担額の増額、生活困窮者支援の実質的な切り下げなどでさらに苦しい生活を強いられています。今や、日本の労働人口の4割、すなわち2千万人を超す労働者が、十分な労働者権利を保障されていない非正規労働者です。「強い国家」の再建をめざすという「アベノミクス」の実態は、したがって、市民生活を徹底的に破壊する、「社会崩壊政策」以外のなにものでもありません。アメリカ同様、私たちの国でもまた、貧困者はますます貧困化しており、とりわけ母子家庭と老人たちの生活がひじょうに苦しくなっています。

 

安倍政権は、外交問題においては、いわゆる「尖閣諸島」領有問題で、その歴史的な背景を全く無視して一方的な主張を繰り返すばかりで、中国政府との冷静な対話で解決をしようという努力を完全に放棄して、国家機能を麻痺させている状態です。その上、安倍首相は、「日本軍慰安婦=性奴隷」問題では、「強制連行を証明する証拠資料は存在しない」という事実とは全く異なった発言を繰り返しています。この問題で日本の責任を明確に認めた1993 年8月の「河野洋平官房長官談話」についても、「見直しを含めて有識者が検討するのが望ましい」という恥ずべき公式見解を発表しました。1948年11月の東京裁判結審で、日本が犯した「平和に対する罪」と明確に定義・判断され、その後の国際法学界でも広く受け入れられてきた「侵略戦争」についても、「侵略という定義は学界的にも国際的にも定まっていない」などと発言して、厚顔無恥さを曝け出しました。これが、長年にわたって日本の保守政治家の歴史認識の貧困性を批判してきた韓国や中国のみならず、欧米諸国においても厳しい日本政府批判を再発させました。そのため、安倍首相は、国外では戦争責任問題言及の回避に努める一方で、国内では靖国参拝問題や「教育再生」政策でナショナリズムを煽るという矛盾した言動をとり、ますます国際的信用を低下させています。

 

あなたは、あなたの国が「過去の過ちから何も学んでいないように思えます」と言われましたが、上に述べたように、その点では日本は米国と同じです。その上、1945年8月にあなたの国が犯した最も由々しい「人道に対する罪」、つまり原爆による無差別大量殺傷の犠牲に2回も私たちはさせられたにもかかわらず、私たちの政府はアメリカの核戦略をずっと支持し続けてきましたし、1953年12月のアイゼンハワー大統領の「アトムズ・フォア・ピース」演説以来、原子力利用の推進に邁進してきました。その結果、史上最悪の原発事故を福島で引き起こしてしまいました。今や、大量の高レベル放射能汚染水を毎日太平洋に流し続けている上に、地震と爆発で崩れかかった原子炉4号機の建屋には1533本もの燃料棒がプールに入っていて、全く手がつけられない状態になっています。この燃料棒にはヒロシマ型原爆5000発以上のセシウムが含まれていますので、4号機建屋が倒壊したら、日本全国どころか北半球のほとんどの地域が放射能で汚染されます。東京にはもちろん誰も住めなくなり、2020年オリンピック東京開催計画など、一瞬にして吹っ飛んでしまいます。長期的に観ると、これは人類を含む地球上のあらゆる生きものの存続を脅かす、ひじょうに重大な問題です。

 

あなたは、「人間性を守り、目下、急速に進んでいる気候変動の猛襲から地球を守る闘い」で日本とアメリカは同盟国であり続けなければならないと言われました。基本的に私はあなたの意見に賛成です。しかし、日米同盟両国にとって、目下、最も緊急且つ危険で手強い「敵」は、この福島第1原発が引き起こす危険性のある、これまで人類が経験したことのない規模での「核ホロコースト」だと私は思います。そこで、私を含めた多くの日本市民から、あなたご自身を含めた多くのアメリカ市民の皆さんへ強くお願いをしたいことがあります。今、福島が直面している危機的状況をなんとか早急に克服するために、日米両国のあらゆる知恵を結集して至急に解決策を打ち出すよう、私たち日米両国市民が一致協力して、日米両国政府に要請する運動を、それぞれの国で広く展開すべきだと思います。どうぞ、そうした要請運動をぜひともアメリカで起こして下さい。私たちも日本で同じ運動を起こし、展開するよう努力します。

 

大量破壊兵器である核兵器を開発・使用し危険な原子力エネルギー活用を世界的規模で推進してきたあなたの国、アメリカには、福島原発事故で日本を支援する責任があると私は思います。同じように、核兵器で多くの犠牲者を出したにもかかわらず、アメリカの核戦略と原子力政策を全面的に支援し、自らも原発を乱立させてきた日本にも重大な責任があると思います。**その責任とは、両国の市民が、放射能という危機に迫られている(これから産まれてくる世代を含む)人類全体のみならず、この地球上のあらゆる生きもと環境を守る責任だと私は考えます。

 

以上があなたのお手紙への私の応答ですが、これを機会に多くの日米両国の市民がこのサイトで意見を交換し合い、今私たちが共通に直面している様々な問題解決のために力を合わせて活動していくことを心から願って止みません。

 

2013年9月11日

田中利幸

一広島市民

 

*原発と原爆 日本の原子力とアメリカの影(1) - Dailymotion動画
  http://www.dailymotion.com/video/x12zo4r
**原発と原爆 日本の原子力とアメリカの影(2) - Dailymotion動画
  http://www.dailymotion.com/video/x12znzk_

Comments
Add comment
Authors: Yuki TANAKA