Subscribe to the Journal:

APJ
is a reader-supported journal

Tax deductible Contributions welcome via Pay Pal or credit card. If you would like to support the Journal, please do so here. The Asia-Pacific Journal is available free to all. Your support allows us to improve our service in a new era of conflict in the Asia-Pacific.
Donate:
$25.00 $50.00 $100.00


Join Us:JapanFocus Twitter page  APJ Facebook Page  

Display Your BOOK, FILM, OR EVENT here

 Peace  Philosophy  Centre

Dialogue and learning for creating a peaceful, sustainable world.


 

 

Click a cover to order.
Click a cover to order.
Click a cover to order.
Click a cover to order.
Click a cover to order.
Click a cover to order.
The Asia-Pacific Journal: Japan Focus
In-depth critical analysis of the forces shaping the Asia-Pacific...and the world.
Ban Ki-moon's Visit to Chernobyl  潘基文のチェルノブイリ訪問
May. 16, 2011

 

 

On April 25, UN Secretary General Ban Ki-moon published an opinion piece in the New York Times marking the 25th anniversary of the Chernobyl tragedy. In it, Ban highlighted the parallels between Chernobyl and the ongoing crisis in Fukushima. While the Chernobyl crisis saw a much larger initial radiation release, reports now indicate a series of meltdowns at Fukushima. Reactor No. 1 is now known to have melted down just hours after the initial earthquake hit. In addition, reactors No. 2 and No. 3 are also thought to be in a state of meltdown. In this context, Ban calls on the world to rethink the place of nuclear power in global energy strategies.

 

The New York Times

April 25, 2011

 

A Visit to Chernobyl

 

By BAN KI-MOON

 

Twenty-five years ago, the explosion at Chernobyl cast a radioactive cloud over Europe and a shadow around the world. Today, the tragedy at Japan’s Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant continues to unfold, raising popular fears and difficult questions.

 

Visiting Chernobyl a few days ago, I saw the reactor, still deadly but encased in concrete. The adjoining town of Pripyat was dead and silent — houses empty and falling into ruin, mute evidence of lives left behind, an entire world abandoned and lost to those who loved it.

 

More than 300,000 people were displaced in the Chernobyl disaster; roughly six million were affected. A swathe of geography half the size of Italy or my own country, the Republic of Korea, was contaminated.

 

It is one thing to read about Chernobyl from afar. It is another to see for it. For me, the experience was profoundly moving, and the images will stay with me for many years. I was reminded of a Ukrainian proverb: “There is no such thing as someone else’s sorrow.” The same is true of nuclear disasters. There is no such thing as some other country’s catastrophe.

 

As we are painfully learning once again, nuclear accidents respect no borders. They pose a direct threat to human health and the environment. They cause economic disruptions affecting everything from agricultural production to trade and global services.

 

This is a moment for deep reflection, a time for a real global debate. To many, nuclear energy looks to be a clean and logical choice in an era of increasing resource scarcity. Yet the record requires us to ask: have we correctly calculated its risks and costs? Are we doing all we can to keep the world’s people safe?

 

Because the consequences are catastrophic, safety must be paramount. Because the impact is transnational, these issues must be debated globally.

 

That is why, visiting Ukraine for the 25th anniversary of the disaster, I put forward a five-point strategy to improve nuclear safety for our future:

 

•First, it is time for a top to bottom review of current safety standards, both at the national and international levels.

 

•Second, we need to strengthen the work of the International Atomic Energy Agency on nuclear safety.

 

•Third, we must put a sharper focus on the new nexus between natural disasters and nuclear safety. Climate change means more incidents of freak and increasingly severe weather. With the number of nuclear facilities set to increase substantially over the coming decades, our vulnerability will grow.

 

•Fourth, we must undertake a new cost-benefit analysis of nuclear energy, factoring in the costs of disaster preparedness and prevention as well as cleanup when things go wrong.

 

•Fifth and finally, we need to build a stronger connection between nuclear safety and nuclear security. At a time when terrorists seek nuclear materials, we can say with confidence that a nuclear plant that is safer for its community is also more secure for the world.

 

My visit to Chernobyl was not the first time I have traveled to a nuclear site. A year ago, I went to Semipalatinsk in Kazakhstan, ground zero for nuclear testing in the former Soviet Union. Last summer in Japan, I met with the Hibakusha, survivors of the atomic blasts at Nagasaki and Hiroshima.

 

I went to these places to highlight the importance of disarmament. For decades, negotiators have sought agreement on limiting (and perhaps ultimately eliminating) nuclear weapons. And this past year, we have seen very encouraging progress.

 

With the memory of Chernobyl and, now, the disaster in Fukushima, we must widen our lens. Henceforth, we must treat the issue of nuclear safety as seriously as we do nuclear weapons.

 

The world has witnessed an unnerving history of near-accidents. It is time to face facts squarely. We owe it to our citizens to practice the highest standards of emergency preparedness and response, from the design of new facilities through construction and operation to their eventual decommissioning.

 

Issues of nuclear power and safety are no longer purely matters of national policy, alone. They are a matter of global public interest. We need international standards for construction, agreed guarantees of public safety, full transparency and information-sharing among nations.

 

Let us make that the enduring legacy of Chernobyl. Amid the silence there, I saw signs of life returning. A new protective shield is being erected over the damaged reactor. People are beginning to return. Let us resolve to dispel the last cloud of Chernobyl and offer a better future for people who have lived for too long under its shadow.

 

Ban Ki-moon is the secretary general of the United Nations

 

2011年4月25日

ニューヨーク・タイムズ

チェルノブイリを訪ねて

潘 基文

 

25年前、チェルノブイリ爆発はヨーロッパ全土に放射性雲を、世界中に暗い影を投げかけました。そして今日、日本の福島第一原発で生じた悲劇はまだ進行中であり、恐怖は広がり、数々の難問を突き付けています。

 

数日前、チェルノブイリを訪れ、いまだに非常に危険な状態で、コンクリートに閉じ込められている原子炉を見ました。隣町のプリピャチは人の気配がなく、荒廃した静かな空き家は、生活があったことのもの言わぬ証拠となり、かつてそれを愛した人々にとって世界は打ち捨てられ、失われています。

 

30万人以上の人々がチェルノブイリの災害で強制避難させられました;600万人ほどの人々が影響を受けました。イタリア、もしくは私の国である韓国の半分の面積の地域が汚染されました。

 

遠くにいながらチェルノブイリについて学ぶことはできますが、やはり百聞は一見に如かずです。私にとってチェルノブイリ訪問は非常に感動的な経験で、そこで見たものは長い間忘れられないでしょう。ウクライナのことわざ、「ほかの誰かの悲しみなどというものはない」を思い出していました。これは核の災害にも当てはまります。どこかほかの国の大災害などというものはあり得ないのです。

 

私たちは現在、核の事故に国境などないという苦い教訓を、再び学んでいます。事故は人類の健康と環境に直接的な脅威をもたらします。農産物輸出入から世界的なサービス業にいたるまで、すべてに影響する経済的混乱をひきおこします。

 

今こそ私たちは深く考えるべき時であり、世界的な議論を喚起する時機なのです。資源不足が拡大する中、多くの人々にとって、核エネルギーはクリーンで論理的な選択のように見えます。しかし事故の歴史は問いかけます。私たちは核エネルギーにともなう危険性とコストを正しく計算したのか。私たちは世界の人々の安全を維持するために、できるすべてのことをやっているのか。

 

一端事故になるとその結果は大惨事となるので、安全は何よりも重要です。そして事故の影響は世界中に広がるので、世界的議論が必要なのです。

 

そういった理由で災害の25周年にウクライナを訪れ、私たちの将来のために核の安全性を改善するため、5つの戦略を提唱します:

 

・第一に今こそ、現在の安全基準を徹底的に見直すこと。これは各国の国内基準と国際的な基準の両方のレベルで行われるべきです。

 

・第二に、核の安全性において国際原子力機関(IAEA)の機能を強化するべきです。

 

・第三に、自然災害と核の安全性の間の新たなつながりに鋭く焦点を当てなければなりません。気候変動は、より異常な事象を引き起こし、ますます厳しい天候をもたらします。来る数十年の間に核関係の施設は大幅に増加することが予想され、より大惨事が生まれやすい状況となります。

 

・第四に、私たちは災害への備え、事故のときの処置はもちろん、事故防止のための経費を計算に入れ、核エネルギーの費用効果分析をする義務があります。

 

・第五に、そして最後になりますが、私たちは核の安全性と安全保障との間に、より強固な関係を築く必要があります。テロリストたちが核物質の入手を図る現在、地域社会にとってより安全な原子力発電所はまた、世界にとってもはるかに安全なものであるといって間違いないでしょう。

 

チェルノブイリは、私が初めて訪れた核施設ではありません。1年前、旧ソビエト連邦の核実験の爆心地だった、カザフスタンのセミパラティンスクに参りました。昨年の夏は日本を訪れ、長崎と広島の原爆の生存者である、ヒバクシャの方々にお会いしました。

 

私がこれらの地に赴いたのは、軍縮の重要性を訴えるためでした。これまで何十年もの間、核兵器の保有制限(そしてねがわくば最終的な廃絶)についての合意をめざす交渉がおこなわれてきましたが、ちょうど昨年は非常に力強い進展がみられました。

 

かつてチェルノブイリで起きた出来事に加えて福島でも大惨事が起きた今、私たちは視野を広げなければなりません。核の安全性の問題は、核兵器の場合と同様、今後は真剣に取り扱っていかなければなりません。

 

世界ではこれまで、間一髪の恐ろしい事故が続いてきました。今こそ、真摯に事実と向き合うべきときです。新規施設の設計から建設、操業、そして最終的な解体に至るまで、最高水準の危機管理・危機対応を行っていくことこそが、私たちが市民に対して負う義務だといえます。

 

核とその安全性の問題はもはや、単に国家政策のみの問題ではありません。これらは世界的な公益にかかわる問題なのです。国際的な建設基準や、公衆の安全を保障する規定の策定、国家間における完全な透明性の確保と、情報共有が必要です。

 

そのことをチェルノブイリの永続的な遺産にしましょう。チェルノブイリで、私は静けさの中に生命が戻ってきている兆しを目にしました。損傷した原子炉の上には、新しい防護壁が築かれようとしています。人々は帰還しはじめています。チェルノブイリに立ち込める最後の雲を追い払いましょう。そして、その雲の影であまりにも長い間暮らしてきた人びとに対して、よりよい未来を提供しようではありませんか。

 

国連事務総長  潘 基文

(翻訳 小椋優子 田中泉 乗松聡子)

Comments
Add comment